Breaking World News

Breaking World News

White House signals that the U.S. is likely to exit Paris climate deal
“President Trump is still undecided but leaning toward withdrawing the United States from the landmark Paris climate agreement, White House officials said Wednesday, a move that would honor a campaign vow but risk rupturing global alliances and disappointing both environmentalists and corporate titans…” (The Washington Post)

Trump administration moves to return Russian compounds in Maryland and New York
“The Trump administration is moving toward handing back to Russia two diplomatic compounds, near New York City and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, that its officials were ejected from in late December as punishment for Moscow’s interference in the 2016 presidential election…” (The Washington Post)

Corbyn confronts Rudd over spending cuts in fractious TV debate
“Jeremy Corbyn challenged Amber Rudd over the impact of the government’s spending cuts on Wednesday night, as he sought to exploit the cracks in the Conservatives’ general election campaign with his last-minute decision to take part in a live leaders’ debate on BBC1…” (The Guardian)

UK government sued for third time over illegal air pollution from diesels
“Environmental lawyers are taking the government to the high court for a third time in a bid to remove “major flaws” from minister’s plans to tackle the UK’s illegal levels of air pollution…” (The Guardian)

Yemen facing total collapse as war continues, UN warns
“The United Nations humanitarian chief has said Yemen is facing “total social, economic and institutional collapse”” (BBC – Middle East)

Russia fires cruise missiles at IS targets in Syria
“A Russian warship and submarine in the Mediterranean have fired four cruise missiles at so-called Islamic State (IS) positions in central Syria…” (BBC – Middle East)

Police target teen gang in Castle Hill, Bad Machine Brotherhood
“HILLS police are putting the squeeze on a youth gang operating in Castle Hill called the Bad Machine Brotherhood…” (news.com.au)

Malaysia Airlines: A man threatening to ‘blow up’ a plane is the latest in a long line of incidents
“A MAN threatening to “blow up” a Malaysia Airlines flight en-route to Kuala Lumpur from Melbourne is just the latest in a string of episodes to strike the beleaguered airline in recent years…” (news.com.au)

Filmmaker wins for third time at Cannes
“Mexican filmmaker Michel Franco has won an award at the Cannes Film Festival for the third time…” (Mexico News Daily)

Mexican surfer wins world championship
“18-year-old’s win gave Mexico its first individual medal at the World Surfing Games…” (Mexico News Daily)

Scientists Have Used CRISPR to Slow The Spread of Cancer Cells
“CRISPR-Cas9 is the gene editing tool that promised to change the world.

In the short time since its discovery, it has snipped HIV out of human immune cells, sparked a biomedical race between the US and China to work toward bioengineered humans, and now scientists have used CRISPR-Cas9 to slow the spread of cancer…” (Science Alert)

Strange, Violent Dreams Could Be Trying to Warn Us About Future Brain Disease
“Researchers have found an unexpected link between strange, physically violent dreaming and the risk of neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s and dementia, later in life, and say they could act as an early warning sign decades before diagnosis…” (Science Alert)

 

Photo: joelbeeb [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

All the Kind Strangers, starring Stacy Keach and John Savage, 1974

All the Kind Strangers, starring Stacy Keach and John Savage, 1974

All the Kind Strangers, 1974

A film by Burt Kennedy

“A couple traveling through a backwoods area are held by a group of orphans who want them to become their parents. Unfortunately, the kids have a habit of killing adults who refuse that particular honor.” (IMDB)

(Browse our Movie Archive)

Assignment Outer Space, a film by Antonio Margheriti, 1960

Assignment Outer Space, a film by Antonio Margheriti, 1960

Assignment Outer Space, 1960

A film by Antonio Margheriti

A bold news reporter clashes with a space station commander while on assignment in outer space. Soon he must risk his life to save the earth from a damaged space craft that poses a grave threat.

(Browse our Movie Archive)

The history of Memorial Day

The history of Memorial Day

The last Monday in May is Memorial Day in the U.S., which is a day reserved to honor those who died serving their country in the military.

The management team of Face Activities wishes our members and their families a meaningful and thoughtful memorial day.

This video is a brief history, and meaning, of the holiday:

 

Photo: By U.S. Department of Defense Current Photos130528-F-AQ406-201, Public Domain, Link

Musician Greg Allman dies at 69

Musician Greg Allman dies at 69

Greg Allman, master musician and member of the Allman Brother’s Band, has died Saturday, at 69, following a period of ill health.

The Allman Brother’s, known for such classics as “Midnight Rider,” “Tied to the Whipping Post,” and the lively “Ramblin’ Man,” pioneered the Southern Rock Style, which combed multiple lead guitars, and merged blues and jazz traditions, along with great musicality and passion, to the delight of fans for decades.

Here’s a brief discussion recapping his career, challenges and contributions to music, and a tribute video compilation of his work:

By Carl Lender – originally posted to Flickr as Allman Brothers Band – Gregg Allman, CC BY 2.0, Link

Woody Woodpecker in Pantry Panic, by Walter Lantz, 1941

woody-woodpecker-pantry-panic

Woody Woodpecker in Pantry Panic, 1941

A film by Walter Lantz

Despite a warning from the groundhog, Woody decides to skip flying south for the winter, but faces hardship and almost starves. How does this clever and resourceful bird survive?

(Browse our Movie Archive)

Screen Actor Roger Moore dies at 89

Screen Actor Roger Moore dies at 89

Sir Roger George Moore, KBE, the screen actor best known for his suave, yet good-humored portrayal of British Secret Service Agent James Bond, following Sean Connery’s early break out performances, has died at 89, following a battle with cancer.

Tall, handsome, quintessentially British, with a sophisticated demeanor and a dash of comic timing, Roger Moore won over James Bond fans at a difficult juncture, after the early golden years of Sean Connery, a legendary performer who introduced the classic Ian Flemming character to the silver screen. Moore’s first Bond film was “Live and Let Die,” in 1973, and he starred in a total of 7 Bond films through 1985.

Prior to his role as Agent 007, Moore gained acclaim playing Secret Agent Simon Templar on television’s “The Saint,” between 1962 and 1969, a role which was excellent preparation for his work on the big screen to come.

Though Moore earned fame and fortune thanks to his on-screen work, he considered his philanthropic efforts for UNICEF to be his life’s greatest achievement. He was appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in 1991, and was Knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 2003, in recognition of his dedication to charitable work. In addition, the French Government conferred a great honor, appointing him as a Commander in the prestigious Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

Moore attended Launceston College, and worked briefly in the field of animation. His father, a police officer, worked on a robbery case at the home of director Brian Desmond Hurst, who gave the young Moore his first film role as an extra in the 1945 movie “Caesar and Cleopatra.” Hurst also paid Moore’s tuition at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and so was instrumental in helping the young actor develop his skill-set and launch his early career.

Photo: By Allan warren – File:Sir Roger Moore Allan Warren.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

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